The Most Hated Man on Twitter

Tim JamesHonestly, I’m surprised this didn’t get more buzz.

We’ve seen celebrities utilize their twitter popularity for good causes. Drew Carey and Drew Olanoff combined forces to raise money for Livestrong. Ashton, CNN and Oprah had their exciting fly net twitter race thing.

Daniel Tosh used twitter a little differently. On his show Tosh.o, he did a segment he called “Is it racist?” in which he showed this video from Tim James’ campaign for Governor of Alabama.  After reassuring us that it was in fact, very racist, he then tells the audience to tweet their thoughts to James on his twitter account: @TimJames2010.

Don’t bother looking up the account…it’s already been taken down.  I don’t think any amount of PR could weather that shit storm.

Luckily, twitter doesn’t forget, and a quick search for his twitter name will show you that people are STILL sharing their thoughts with James (the episode aired over a month ago on June 17, 2010).

You can watch the whole video it here.

Within seconds, James’ reply stream was flooded with messages of hatred and anger.  Tosh even responded hilariously to some of the tweets on the blog.

James abruptly became the first individual (using twitter) I’ve seen get ridiculed on such a large scale on twitter.  In a flash, he became the most hated man on twitter.

Of course the fact that he had a twitter account is what opened him up to this attack.  Because people could @reply him, they felt like they were talking to him, not just about him.

Think about this power.  The power to immediately drown someone’s reputation using the web.  You can’t search James’ name on twitter without some ruthless attacks coming up.

Makes you think about the power individuals have on the web today…and the importance of using that influence responsibly. [insert spider man quote]

It’s also a reminder that by creating an account on twitter, you are opening up a new communication line directly to you.  If you make a mistake, whether you want to use twitter to listen or not doesn’t matter.  People will tell you what they think if they want to…

…or if comedy central tells them to.

Book Review: 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing

I’m trying out viddler for the first time. I loved how simple it was. The only hiccup was the flash player crashing after I recorded this whole video the first time. Are you guys using viddler? Is youtube or something else better?

This week I reviewed the 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing by Al Ries & Jack Trout. It’s a book that I think every marketer should read. A lot of the stuff they talk about, we already kind of know. The way they present it though, allows you to understand how marketing works, at it’s core.

The big takeaway I got from this book is that much, if not all of marketing is about perception. In business, perception is everything. There are a number of factors, or “laws” that explain why consumers, perceive businesses the way they do.

Each one of these laws are carefully, but clearly laid out in this book. I’ve read books where authors dance hypothetically around obscure ideas. Reis and Trout sound like they know their shit, and make it very easy for you to grasp their message. No bullshit.

Published in 1993, many of the examples they use are something a millennial may have to rack their brains to remember (if they’re like me). The lessons behind the examples however, are as relevant today as they were then.

Give it a read. If you already have, what did you think?

Learn more:  The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing: Violate Them at Your Own Risk! [Amazon Affil]

Join Us for the #u30pro One Year Anniversary Chat

Photo cred: Theresa Thompson

Tonight will be the One Year Anniversary of the very first #u30pro chat.

Oh the memories.  Chats with 10 people attending.  Launching the digest.  Scott joining the team.  It’s been a really exciting year for the community.

Tonight we’re going to bring back a crowd-favorite topic: Networking.  We discussed this topic almost a year ago and we’re ready to hit it up with the full force of what the chat has become today.

In just a year a lot has changed in the networking discussion.  The job market is different, starting a blog does always do what it used to, and new tools are coming out every day.  The discussion will be sure to come out with some valuable insights into networking in 2010 and beyond.

So, thank you for making the #u30pro community into what it is today.  It’s been an amazing experience for Lauren, Scott and myself.  We have some big plans for the next year, including a website, more meetups (the first one with Brazen Careerist was lots of fun last night) and more.

We hope you’ll join us tonight at 8pm est for the One Year Anniversary chat on Networking.

Should Your Community Manager be a Leader?

Photo cred: Steve Jurvetson

Does a Community Manager need to be a leader?

I asked this question and god a lot of different views after a really insightful conversation with Teresa Basich on twitter.  I think that leadership CAN play a role in community management in a number of ways, but it is not a pre-requisite.

When talking about something as broad and undefined as “Community Management”, you’re going to get a lot of varied angles.

The Community Manager can be a leader in the space.

When I think about this, I think about people like DJ Waldow, the Community Manager for Blue Sky Factory.  People view DJ as a leader in the email marketing space and so his participation in the “email marketing community” will drive potential customers to their service.

I think about people like Andrew Hyde who until recently was the Community Director for TechStars.  Andrew has become a leader in the startup space, starting projects like Startup Weekend (which is so awesome), and so by participating in the start-up space, he drives more recognition and credibility to TechStars.

This obviously isn’t all they do, but I see it as a big part.

If your Community Manager is a recognized leader in the space, their influence can really help your brand.  Imagine if Seth Godin emailed you, personally asking you to write about his project on your blog.  Chances are, you’ll give that email some real consideration.

The Community Manager can be a leader for the brand’s community.

When I think about this role, I think about Ryan Paugh, the Director of Community for Brazen Careerist.  Ryan is extremely active within the Brazen community.  He drives conversations, acknowledges loyal users and is constantly interacting.  He is the leader of the Brazen community in my eyes.

I think about Erin Bury, the Community Manager for Sprouter.  Erin hosts events for entrepreneurs, interacts and drives the community within Sprouter.  She too is a leader for her brand’s community.

This gives the community a central person to turn to with their feedback, and questions.  It gives a face to the brand.

The Community Manager should be a leader within the company.

See Andreana Drencheva’s post that reminded me of this one.

This is an important one. I think that whoever is driving your company’s community efforts should be a leader within your company.

They should be someone who has the authority to make decisions and influence other decision makers.

They should be someone who can take the needs of the community and implement them quickly.

They should be a leader in the company because when they interact, it makes the customer and community feel more entitled.  It lets the community know that you care about them.  If your intern is talking to me on twitter, I feel a lot less connected to your brand than if I’m talking to the CEO.

With that said…

I don’t think that the community manager absolutely has to be a leader.  Or at least, there are different ways to look at it.  I think one great method is the “Lead from behind” method (Thanks Alexa).  It’s about understanding what drives a community and providing the resources for it do grow.  It’s about identifying the natural leaders in your community and letting them lead.

A Community Manager might have more “behind the scenes” responsibilities, depending on their goals.  If they’re more strategy focused, they may just need to be savvy in putting the pieces in place.  They may have more of a marketing focus, working more on campaigns.

What’s your take?  Does a Community Manager need to be a leader?