8 Too Many Responsibilities of a Community Manager

Photo cred: Thomas Hawk

Community Manager.

It’s a title that didn’t exist a few years ago.  Now, in 2010, every business and their mother has one.

…but what is a “community manager”.  Everyone seems to have a different perspective on the responsibilities of a community manager.

Here’s your (shitty) answer: It’s a broad term.

…and the problem is that so often, since the responsibilities aren’t clearly defined, they are ALL expected.  Then community managers end up having to answer for 7 full time jobs worth of results.

A title “community manager” can be broken down into countless other titles.  But since titles don’t actually mean anything (I make up a new one for myself every day), I’ll list out the some of the possible responsibilities that a community manager could have.  They might do one of these things.  They might do 3.  I hope, for their sake, they aren’t responsible for all of them.

Let me know if I forget any:

  1. Customer Service. Responding to customer complaints wherever they may occur.
  2. PR. Announcing new developments, responding to crisis, seeking media coverage, etc…
  3. Marketing. Improving brand recognition, launching contests, sharing content and media etc…
  4. Evangelist. Loving the crap out of your brand…in public.
  5. Content producer. Writing blog posts, creating videos, conducting interviews, tweeting, all that good stuff.
  6. Business development. Establishing partnerships, creating leads for the sales team to follow up on.
  7. Spokesperson. Attends and speaks at events.  “The face” of your company.
  8. Event planner. Hosts events and builds a community through offline interactions.

Don’t make the mistake of hiring a community manager because “everyone else has one”.  Know which specific responsibilities you need handled, and hire accordingly.

Then you can call them your “community manager”, or your “social media mega magician-ator” or whatever you want.

Good luck,

David

Chief Juggling Officer, Scribnia.com

How Would You Fix this Disconnect in Social Media Hiring?

Photo cred: madebytess

My friend Amber Naslund had a great post recently about the problems with social media job descriptions. I agreed with much of what she said.  So many job descriptions for social media related positions really just make me laugh.

My first reaction is usually to blame the company.  They obviously don’t get “it” and are making themselves look foolish with these job descriptions they’re posting online.

But wait…

Why am I blaming the company?

I thought we’re encouraging companies to start to experiment with social media platforms.  I thought companies are supposed to open their mind.  Now when they take their first step into social media, we judge them for not getting it right?

Amber really got me thinking.  How can companies, who know nothing about social media, know what to ask of a social media job candidate?  There’s a disconnect there.

How can companies fill this disconnect?  Should they start by approaching social media platforms with the employees and resources they already have?  Then when they’re a bit more comfortable with it, they can hire and build out a full team?  That’s what Lee Aase and the Mayo Clinic did and it seemed to work pretty well for them.

Or do they rely on external recruiters? Hire someone to hire someone?

I have my own ideas which I’ll end up sharing in the comments, but I’d like to hear your thoughts first.

What do you think?