Join Us for the #u30pro One Year Anniversary Chat

Photo cred: Theresa Thompson

Tonight will be the One Year Anniversary of the very first #u30pro chat.

Oh the memories.  Chats with 10 people attending.  Launching the digest.  Scott joining the team.  It’s been a really exciting year for the community.

Tonight we’re going to bring back a crowd-favorite topic: Networking.  We discussed this topic almost a year ago and we’re ready to hit it up with the full force of what the chat has become today.

In just a year a lot has changed in the networking discussion.  The job market is different, starting a blog does always do what it used to, and new tools are coming out every day.  The discussion will be sure to come out with some valuable insights into networking in 2010 and beyond.

So, thank you for making the #u30pro community into what it is today.  It’s been an amazing experience for Lauren, Scott and myself.  We have some big plans for the next year, including a website, more meetups (the first one with Brazen Careerist was lots of fun last night) and more.

We hope you’ll join us tonight at 8pm est for the One Year Anniversary chat on Networking.

Using Seesmic Desktop to Manage Streams of Information

This week, our #u30pro chat is on “managing your information streams” so I figured I’d share a little bit about how I manage my twitter streams to consume, and share content.

Whether you’re a casual twitter user, or you tweet more than you speak, I highly recommend trying out a desktop client like Seesmic Desktop (the app I use) or the other big option, Tweetdeck.

I never really grasped the value in twitter until I started using some 3rd Party Apps. If you don’t want to download a client, try out Hootsuite.  I use it to schedule my tweets.

My stream is bigger than your stream.

I currently have 5 accounts that I manage using Seesmic:

  1. My personal twitter account.
  2. My personal facebook account.
  3. The Scribnia twitter account.
  4. The Scribnia facebook page.
  5. The #u30pro twitter account.

So any time I post a message, I can check off any number of these accounts, and the message will go out to each one I check off.

As you can see from the scroll bar at the bottom of that image, I have quite a few columns in there.  Let me go through them:

1. The Basics

The first 2 columns are where I view all the basic tweets. I’ll use the first column to click through the home feeds for each account and my direct messages.  The second column is where I see all my replies (for all accounts).

2. The Groups

Ok you caught me, I don’t keep a close eye on all 1000 people that I follow.  I do check up on each feed several times a day, but there are some people I want to make sure I don’t miss.

I have 4 groups:

  1. Focus. These are people that I don’t know too well yet, but I want to interact with them more often and get to know them better.  I keep this group to 20 or less people to make sure I am in fact, focusing on them.
  2. Twitter’s Finest. I’ve maintained this group for well over a year now.  It’s the people I know, and trust.  The people I don’t want to miss.
  3. Blogging Tips. This is a feed of people that share a lot of blogging tip content.  I use this group to find good content to share with the Scribnia community.
  4. Scribnia Community. These people are Scribnia’s most active and supportive members.  I use this group to be sure to I’m interacting with the people who have helped us grow.

3. The Searches

I won’t get too into detail for these ones because they tend to change pretty often.  A few keywords that I keep all the time:

  • Scribnia: to keep an eye out for mentions.
  • #u30pro: to see what content our community is sharing throughout the week
  • #blogchat: my other favorite chat that provides some solid content throughout the week

I keep a number of search columns open.  I experiment with different keywords such as “looking for new blogs” or “help blogging” that will allow me to find people in Scribnia’s potential audience to help on twitter.

I’ll also keep tabs on mentions of competitors, and random chats that I come across.

So…

That’s how I organize my streams of information.

How do you organize your streams of information? If you’re around, please join us tomorrow night (8pm est) for a #u30pro chat on managing your streams of information, on (and off) the clock.

Join the Discussion: Building your Network vs. Enhancing Current Relationships

Photo cred: D. Sharon Pruitt

One year ago, I was just graduating college.  I had only really been networking for a few months, so it was still very new to me.

Every day, I’d meet someone new, who would introduce me to someone else, and so on…  Before I knew it, I had a healthy sized network of trusted professionals that I could turn to.  Many of them have became close friends over time.  Others not so much.

The problem is that all connections, even those connections that you have become so close with, can fall out of touch over time.  There are a number of reasons for this happening…

  1. We all have jobs to do which means less time to “catch up”.
  2. As our networks grow, we can’t commit as much time to keeping up with current connections.
  3. The worst reason but one that needs to be addressed: You just don’t need those people as much as you used to.
  4. Sometimes you just go different ways.  It happens with friends too.

It happens, but I don’t like it.  I feel terrible some days when I see someone cross my twitter feed and realize how long it’s been since I’ve spoken to them.

I understand that it happens…but I also feel like I can do more to enhance my current connections, instead of focusing only on expanding my network.

Have you faced this dilemna?  Please, share your thoughts in a comment.

You can also join us for a full discussion on this topic at the #u30pro chat on Thursday (May 27th) at 8pm est on twitter.

A Problem With Twitter Chats?

Photo cred: Lise

Who owns a community on twitter? No one can moderate it so does anyone really control it?

After participating in #blogchat last weekend, I read a post from Mack Collier. The comments held a lively debate. I suggest you read a bit of the comments, but the basic argument was this:

Mack commented on the issue of people coming and tweeting out links to their posts using the #blogchat hashtag without really participating in the chat.
Ryan, one of the people Mack quoted in the post, contended that a hashtag isn’t “owned” by anyone. He was using the tag to reach people he thought would find those posts useful. There is no “wrong” way to use a hashtag.

As a fellow chat founder, I understand how Mack felt. He loves his community, and hates to see it mistreated. Still, I realized that our chats are run on a hashtag in a completely open forum. You can’t prevent someone from using a hashtag however they want. No one owns a hashtag.

If someone wanted to start a blogchat today, and say that it’s a hashtag used to share blog posts about blogging, there’s really nothing, the original blogchat community, could do about it. Same for #u30pro…same for any other chat.

Personally, I love that people share good posts in the #u30pro feed throughout the week, as long as it’s not spammy. But really, there’s nothing we can do about it.

Gathering around a common interest is great on twitter. But for large, organized communities, is twitter the best option?

#u30pro Needs an Intern!

It’s been great to watch the community grow around u30pro.  Lauren and I can’t thank you all enough for contributing your time and thoughts every week.

As it continues to grow, u30pro has taken more and more of our time.  Both Lauren and I are very busy with our jobs, and have decided to bring in some help to manage the u30pro projects.

We need an intern.

What can we offer you?

Well, no money…u30pro doesn’t make any.  But we can offer you the chance to gain valuable experience building a strong community, working with the best team ever, some resume juice, and the chance to be part of something fresh and exciting.

What would you do?

  • Help with the weekly digest.
  • Manage other areas where the community expands. (linkedin, facebook, etc…)
  • Participate in chats/help with moderation.
  • Work with partners on our cross-promotional efforts.
  • General promotion of the community.

We’re not a business.  We’re not revenue driven.  We’re just providing a forum for communication amongst one of the most enthusiastic communities around…and loving every minute of it.

If you’re interested in joining us, email me at dspinks5 at gmail dot com with one paragraph explaining why you’d make a good u30pro intern.

NEW: The u30pro Digest

u30pro

#u30pro is a weekly twitter chat (Thursdays at 7pm est) started by Lauren Fernandez and David Spinks that covers topics and issues facing young professionals.

We started the chat at the end of August.  It’s been truly amazing so far and hearing how much everyone enjoys the chats really makes us love hosting them that much more.

We love the idea that young professionals can
have a place to discuss issues that they’re facing, and that we can bring in more experienced professionals to shed some light from the other end of the spectrum.

We’d like to continue to build out the chat and grow the community that is forming around it.  So we decided to launch the u30pro digest!

Once you subscribe, every week we’ll send out a digest of the best blog posts from young professionals in the #u30pro community.  We will also feature a U30 Pro.  You can sign up using the form below.

To subscribe CLICK here.


This is very much a work in progress as we are looking to make u30pro as valuable as possible.  We will continue to build out the chat, this weekly digest, and stay tuned for more updates!

If you’d like to submit blogs to be considered for inclusion in the weekly digest, you can comment here, email it to u30pro [at] gmail [dot] com or DM it on twitter to @u30pro.

Personal Branding from 9-5

clockAt last night’s #u30pro chat we asked the participants to share professional obstacles that they’ve been facing, and then turned it over to the chat to discuss how to overcome these obstacles.

The final obstacle that we discussed left me with a few questions. It was about using twitter while in the office.  This person’s superior asked them not to.

This question forced the young pros that were participating to take a hard look at themselves in the mirror.  Few who have worked in an office can honestly say they’ve never peeked at their facebook, or twitter once in a while.

Then Meghan Butler brought up the “advantage of personal branding” for the company.  That’s to say that to build your personal brand benefits the company, and so it should be alright to do it on company time.

Now I’ve spoken about the battle between your personal brand and your company’s brand before.  In that post I said that your company’s brand should take priority over your personal brand.

This is different though.  It’s about company time.  Should employees be allowed to spend time building their personal brand, while they’re on the clock?  Should they be allowed to use social networks at all?

EDIT: To add to the conversation, Dan Schawbel just tweeted about a research report claiming “24% of employees have been disciplined at work because of social networking”.